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Water Goddess Magnets (Set of 4)

Regular price Rs. 600.00

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Water Goddess Magnets (Set of 4)

Size: 2.5" x 3.5" each 

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Collection

Water Goddess: a pioneering curation of eclectic artworks; imaging the goddess as a personification of water.

Browse Series 1 and Series 2 for details

Designs

Ganga, Alwar School: Ganga ji is seated on a golden throne, dressed in white and gold with elaborate embellishments. In her four-handed avatar, she holds a lotus in one hand  and a kalash (a water pot, typical of all water goddesses) in the other hand. Her impeccable personage is further enhanced by a छत्र (overhead canopy) and आभा (halo). She is seated on a Makara (composite mythical animal), subscribing to classical Gangetic iconography. 

Yamuna, Nathdwara School: The river goddess is imaged in the very specific iconography that the Nathdwara school developed for portraying Yamuna ji, sacred to the Pushti-marg as part of the trinity of Shrinathji, Yamuna and Vallabh Mahaprabhu. Yamuna ji typically looks sideways, holding a garland towards Shrinathji (highlighting the aspect of using images as a backdrop / side panel, typical of the Pichvai tradition). She wears a long lotus garland, and holds lotus flowers in her other hand. 

Saraswati by Debarchan Rout:  Hailing from Odisha, Rout harnesses the powerful visual vocabulary of the Pattachitra style to narrate the story of the water goddesses. Deified in the Vedas, today the river Saraswati is extinct, but has another venerable realm to herself: she is the goddess of learning, wisdom and the arts. Clothed classically in white, she is seated on her regular vahana: the swan; and holds the Vina and the Vedas in her painted hands. 

Water Goddess, Jaipur school: Unlike the river goddess, the water goddess represents the element of water per se, and is independent of affinities with any specific named water body as such. The Water Goddess holds a kalash in two of her four her hands, subscribing to the classical iconography. She emerges from a water body, on a lotus pedestal. This iconic water goddess, charms with her flaring skirt, and bears an intriguing headgear.